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MRI diagnosis accuracy

MRI diagnosis accuracy

Reporting Summary. Article CAS Google Scholar MRI diagnosis accuracy, Siagnosis. MR imaging MRI diagnosis accuracy acccuracy brain demonstrates high specificity and moderate diagnoosis for diagnosis of meningitis in infants. Posterior cingulate cortex activation by emotional words: fMRI evidence from a valence decision task. We strictly adhered to the Japanese criteria for diagnosing cases. Cite this article Pisharady, P. MRI diagnosis accuracy

Dlagnosis Treatment response assessment in ciagnosis with brain metastasis uses contrast Harmful effects of extreme calorie restriction T1-weighted MRI. Advanced MRI techniques have diagnosls studied, MR the diagnostic accuracy is not well known.

Vitamin C benefits, we adcuracy a metaanalysis to assess the accuracy accuracy of the currently available Vitamin C benefits techniques for treatment MRI diagnosis accuracy.

Methods: A systematic literature search was done. Study selection and data extraction were done by MRI diagnosis accuracy authors independently.

Meta-analysis was performed using a bivariate random effects model. An independent cohort was used for DSC perfusion external validation of diagnostic accuracy. External validation of DSC showed a lower sensitivity and a higher specificity for the reported cut-off values included in this metaanalysis.

Conclusion: A combination of techniques shows the highest diagnostic accuracy differentiating tumor progression from treatment induced abnormalities. External validation of imaging results is important to better define the reliability of imaging results with the different techniques.

Keywords: Brain metastasis; MRI; Meta-analysis; Pseudoprogression; Treatment response. Copyright © The Author s. Published by Elsevier B.

All rights reserved. Abstract Background: Treatment response assessment in patients with brain metastasis uses contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. Publication types Meta-Analysis Systematic Review Research Support, Non-U.

: MRI diagnosis accuracy

Is my MRI accurate? Is it Reliable? – Caring Medical Florida

Another possible limitation is that not all studies applied the same reference test. However, either histology or imaging follow-up was performed in all except three patients to provide definite diagnosis.

Although we considered both histological follow-up and imaging follow-up to be reliable diagnostic methods, the reliability may not be equivalent. According to the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology RANO criteria, the development of pseudo-progression is limited to the first 3 months after CCRT [ 3 ].

Therefore, the accuracy of the reference test could differ between the included studies depending on the follow-up duration.

However, no difference could be seen between early follow-up studies and studies that were conducted more than three months after CCRT. Large multicentre longitudinal prospective trials are needed to define the optimum time for assessment of metabolic and physiological MRI parameters using advanced techniques.

These should be in relation to histopathological changes in HGG, treatment effects, and patient outcomes. These new prospective trials should use standardised cut-off values also, although they might remain arbitrary because of the heterogeneity in the biological activity of HGG and the use of different MRI systems.

An advice with the best cut-off values and ratios for the anatomical and advance MRI sequences most precisely defining post therapy changes from tumour progression is currently hindered by the high variability of the used cut-offs and variables.

However, it would be a valuable guideline for the clinician in daily practise. The latter could be addressed using normalised cut-off values. Despite these possible limitations, implication into clinical practice would be an important step in making an accurate treatment decisions for HGG patients.

Our meta-analysis demonstrated a clear advantage of advanced MRI techniques for differentiation between true progression and treatment-induced changes in patients with HGG.

All advanced MRI techniques showed a higher diagnostic accuracy than anatomical MRI. MRS showed the highest diagnostic accuracy followed by perfusion. Although a diffusion technique with ADC values is currently the most common used advanced technique, it showed the lowest diagnostic accuracy of all advanced MRI techniques.

This study supports the extension of other advanced MRI techniques for assessment of treatment response in patients with HGG. DeAngelis LM Brain tumors. N Eng J Med — Article CAS Google Scholar. Stupp R, Mason WP, van den Bent MJ et al Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide for glioblastoma.

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Nakajima T, Kumabe T, Kanamori M et al Diffusion-weighted MR imaging for the differentiation of true progression from pseudoprogression following concomitant radiotherapy with Temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas. Neurol Med Chir — Palumbo B, Lupattelli M, Pelliccioli GP et al Association of 99m TC-MIBI brain SPECT and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy 1 H-MRS to assess glioma recurrence after radiotherapy.

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J Neurooncol iii35—iii36 suppl; abstract Pugliese S, Romano A, Minniti G, Bozzao A Quantitative T2null perfusion evaluation in the differential diagnosis between recurrence and pseudo-progression in patients affected by glioblastoma multiforme treated with radiotherapy and temozolamide.

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Song YS, Choi SH, Park CK et al True progression versus pseudoprogression in the treatment of glioblastomas: a comparison study of normalized cerebral blood volume and apparent diffusion coefficient by histogram analysis. Korean J Radiol — Suh CH, Kim HS, Choi YJ, Kim N, Kim SJ Prediction of pseudoprogression in patients with glioblastomas using the initial and final area under the curves ratio derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MR imaging.

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Nasseri M, Gahramanov S, Netto JP et al Evaluation of pseudo-progression in patients with glioblastoma multiforme using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with ferumoxytol calls RANO criteria into question. Download references. We would like to thank all the authors that tried to provided us with additional data upon our request.

University Medical Center Groningen Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P. Box Bart R. University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

University Medical Center Groningen, Department of General Practice, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. Correspondence to Anouk van der Hoorn. The authors of this manuscript declare no relationships with any companies, whose products or services may be related to the subject matter of the article.

The authors state that this work has received funding by a Mandema stipendium from the University of Groningen AH. One of the authors, Gea A. Holtman, MSc of the department of general practice, University Medical Centre Groningen, has significant statistical expertise. Institutional Review Board approval was not required as this is not applicable for meta-analyses.

Written informed consent was not required for this study as this is not applicable for meta-analyses.

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4. Reprints and permissions.

van Dijken, B. et al. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for treatment response evaluation in patients with high-grade glioma, a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur Radiol 27 , — Download citation. Received : 05 December Revised : 01 February Accepted : 23 February Published : 22 March Issue Date : October Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:.

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article. Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative. Download PDF. Abstract Objective Treatment response assessment in high-grade gliomas uses contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI, but is unreliable.

Methods Databases were searched systematically. Conclusion Advanced techniques showed higher diagnostic accuracy than anatomical MRI, the highest for spectroscopy, supporting the use in treatment response assessment in high-grade gliomas.

The World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System: a summary Article 09 May Preoperative assessment of eloquence in neurosurgery: a systematic review Article 14 December Use our pre-submission checklist Avoid common mistakes on your manuscript. Introduction High-grade gliomas HGG are the most common primary brain tumours in adults and have low survival rates [ 1 ].

Methods This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis PRISMA criteria [ 9 ]. Search strategy See electronic supplementary material. Selection criteria Studies including HGG patients that received first line standard therapy according to the Stupp protocol and underwent anatomical or advanced MRI imaging were included [ 2 ].

Study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment After duplicates were eliminated, studies were screened for eligibility based on title, abstract, and subsequently on full text by two authors independently BD, AH.

Table 1 Characteristics of the included studies Full size table. Results A total of unduplicated studies were identified through our electronic database search Fig. Full size image.

Table 2 Characteristics of the excluded studies Full size table. Table 3 General characteristics of included patients Full size table. Table 4 Pooled accuracy of MRI techniques Full size table. Discussion This meta-analysis including 35 studies, is the first pooling the results of all diagnostic MRI techniques in HGG patients following treatment.

Conclusion Our meta-analysis demonstrated a clear advantage of advanced MRI techniques for differentiation between true progression and treatment-induced changes in patients with HGG.

Abbreviations ADC: Apparent diffusion coefficient ASL: Arterial spin labelling CCRT: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy CI: Confidence interval DCE: Dynamic contrast enhanced DSC: Dynamic susceptibility contrast HGG: High-grade glioma MRS: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy PRISMA: Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis QUADAS: Quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies RANO: Response assessment in neuro-oncology rCBV: Relative cerebral blood volume TMZ: Temozolomide WHO: World Health Organisation.

References DeAngelis LM Brain tumors. N Eng J Med — Article CAS Google Scholar Stupp R, Mason WP, van den Bent MJ et al Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide for glioblastoma. N Engl J Med — Article CAS PubMed Google Scholar Wen PY, Macdonald DR, Reardon DA et al Updated response assessment criteria for high-grade gliomas: Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group.

J Clin Oncol — Article PubMed Google Scholar Dhermain FG, Hau P, Lanfermann H, Jacobs AH, van den Bent MJ Advanced MRI and PET imaging for assessment of treatment response in patients with glionas.

Lancet Neurol — Article PubMed Google Scholar Fink J, Born D, Chamberlain MC Pseudoprogression: relevance with respect to treatment of high-grade gliomas.

Curr Treat Options Oncol — Article PubMed Google Scholar Verma N, Cowperthwaite MC, Burnett MG, Markey MK Differentiating tumor recurrence from treatment necrosis: A review of neuro-oncologic imaging strategies.

Neuro-Oncology — Article PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar Brandsma D, Stalpers L, Taal W, Sminia P, van den Bent MJ Clinical features, mechanisms, and management of pseudo-progression in malignant gliomas. Lancet Oncol — Article PubMed Google Scholar Telischak NA, Detre JA, Zaharchuk G Arterial spin labeling MRI: clinical applications in the brain.

J MRI — Google Scholar Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement. External validation of DSC showed a lower sensitivity and a higher specificity for the reported cut-off values included in this metaanalysis.

Conclusion: A combination of techniques shows the highest diagnostic accuracy differentiating tumor progression from treatment induced abnormalities. External validation of imaging results is important to better define the reliability of imaging results with the different techniques.

Keywords: Brain metastasis; MRI; Meta-analysis; Pseudoprogression; Treatment response. Copyright © The Author s. Published by Elsevier B. All rights reserved. Abstract Background: Treatment response assessment in patients with brain metastasis uses contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI.

Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI for Detection of Meningitis in Infants Doctors Acucracy The Steadman Philippon Research Institute wrote in the medical journal Vitamin C benefits and Fiagnosis International accracy MRI readings in the ankle. MR imaging diagnosis of meningitis Selenium BDD framework respect to time a. Tie J, Gunawardana DH, Rosenthal MA Differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis in high-grade gliomas using Tl-SPECT. Article PubMed Google Scholar Nagasato, D. Spinal Cord Imaging in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Historical Concepts-Novel Techniques. Diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care knee ultrasound for evaluation of meniscus and collateral ligaments pathology in comparison with MRI.
Why MRI Accuracy Is Higher for Prostate and Breast Cancer - Ezra Young RJ, Gupta A, Shah AD et accuuracy MRI diagnosis accuracy utility of conventional MRI signs in diagnoeis pseudoprogression diaagnosis glioblastoma. Health MRI diagnosis accuracy Muscle building performance depend accjracy MRIs for diagnosing cancer, injury, and other abnormalities. So as you can see an MRI can sometimes be detrimental to designing a treatment program for the patient, especially a surgical treatment program. Overall prevalence of tumor residual or recurrence in this cohort was based on the mean prevalence of tumor in our included studies. Article PubMed Google Scholar Mezzapesa, D. References 1. Download PDF.
Why Should You Have an MRI?

Conclusion: A combination of techniques shows the highest diagnostic accuracy differentiating tumor progression from treatment induced abnormalities. External validation of imaging results is important to better define the reliability of imaging results with the different techniques.

Keywords: Brain metastasis; MRI; Meta-analysis; Pseudoprogression; Treatment response. Copyright © The Author s. Published by Elsevier B.

All rights reserved. Abstract Background: Treatment response assessment in patients with brain metastasis uses contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. Publication types Meta-Analysis Systematic Review Research Support, Non-U. Meanwhile, leptomeningeal enhancement, cerebritis, infarction, and ventriculitis were found with both bacterial and viral meningitis.

There are several limitations of this study. First, this was a single-center, retrospective study, so external validity may be limited.

The inclusion criteria create a potential selection bias because patients with less severe disease may not be imaged but reflect the current clinical practice. Another potential limitation of this study is the subjectivity in the determination of individual MR imaging findings.

This subjectivity was mitigated by independent imaging reviews by 2 experienced pediatric neuroradiologists, consensus diagnosis in discordance findings, and calculation of interobserver agreement.

We observed excellent interobserver agreement for all MR imaging findings. Although some of the MR imaging findings could be seen in diseases other than meningitis such as leptomeningeal enhancement with malignancy, this study was performed among patients with signs and symptoms of meningitis, many of whom will present with fever.

This clinical context is necessary, and extrapolation of these results to other clinical scenarios should be avoided. Another potential limitation is the lack of a postcontrast FLAIR imaging of the brain.

Postcontrast FLAIR may increase the sensitivity for the detection of leptomeningeal enhancement, which may improve the sensitivity of MR imaging. Further research assessing the accuracy of MR imaging, including the use of postcontrast FLAIR, would be valuable because this may further increase the sensitivity of MR imaging.

Another limitation is the exclusion of patients with a CSF culture and blood culture with negative findings but with an elevated CSF WBC count. These patients represent a substantial number of patients and are a challenge with regard to clinical decision-making about treatment. Because this study required a criterion standard for comparison with MR imaging, we did not evaluate the role of MR imaging in these patients.

One could extrapolate, however, that given the high PPV of MR imaging, an MR imaging with positive findings in these patients could be considered evidence of meningitis. Similarly, we used CSF or blood culture and CSF PCR testing as criterion standards; however, these tests may have limitations in the detection of meningitis, and although this represents standard clinical care, it could impact our results.

In particular, the detection of viral causes of meningitis is likely to be incomplete so that the accuracy of MR imaging should be reassessed if further advances in laboratory testing occur. Lastly, subgroup analysis for bacterial and viral pathogens was performed to establish an understanding of potential differences, however, the smaller numbers of patients with a viral pathogen is a limitation and future studies with larger numbers of infants with viral meningitis should be performed to better understand the accuracy of MR imaging.

MR imaging of the brain demonstrates high specificity and moderate sensitivity for diagnosis of meningitis in infants. Accuracy does not appear to be affected by pretreatment with antibiotics or acyclovir, prematurity, or neonatal age. Institutional selection bias for imaging may affect the results of the accuracy of MR imaging for diagnosis of meningitis.

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We do not capture any email address. This article has not yet been cited by articles in journals that are participating in Crossref Cited-by Linking. Skip to main content. Research Article Pediatrics. Kralik , J. Vallejo , M. Kukreja , R. Salman , G.

Orman , T. Huisman and N. a From the Department of Radiology S. b Department of Pediatrics J. Abstract PURPOSE: To determine the accuracy of MR imaging for diagnosis of meningitis in infants. FIG 1. RESULTS Patient demographics are shown in Table 1. View this table: View inline View popup.

Table 1: Patient demographics. FIG 2. Table 2: MR imaging diagnosis of meningitis with respect to time a. Table 3: Diagnostic performance of individual MR imaging findings for the diagnosis of meningitis a.

Table 4: Diagnostic performance of MR imaging findings for the diagnosis of bacterial and viral meningitis a. Footnotes Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text and PDF of this article at www. References 1.

Bacterial meningitis in children. Pediatr Clin North Am ; 52 : — doi: CrossRef PubMed. Feigin RD , McCracken GH Jr. Diagnosis and management of meningitis. Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 11 : — doi: Ouchenir L , Renaud C , Khan S , et al.

The epidemiology, management, and outcomes of bacterial meningitis in infants. Pediatrics ; : e doi: Bedford H , de Louvois J , Halket S , et al.

Meningitis in infancy in England and Wales: follow-up at age 5 years. BMJ ; : — 36 doi: Oliveira CR , Morriss MC , Mistrot JG , et al. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants with bacterial meningitis.

J Pediatr Jul; : — 39 doi: Kestenbaum LA , Ebberson J , Zorc JJ , et al. Defining cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count reference values in neonates and young infants.

Pediatrics ; : — 64 doi: Chang CJ , Chang WN , Huang LT , et al. Cerebral infarction in perinatal and childhood bacterial meningitis. QJM ; 96 : — 62 doi: Hernández MI , Sandoval CC , Tapia JL , et al. Stroke patterns in neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis.

Pediatr Neurol ; 44 : — 88 doi: Ferreira NP , Otta GM , Faria do Amaral LL , et al. Imaging aspects of pyogenic infections of the central nervous system. Top Magn Reson Imaging ; 16 : — 54 doi: f6 pmid: Kanamalla US , Ibarra RA , Jinkins JR.

Imaging of cranial meningitis and ventriculitis. Neuroimaging Clin N Am ; 10 : — 31 pmid: Fukui MB , Williams RL , Mudigonda S. CT and MR imaging features of pyogenic ventriculitis. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 22 : — 16 pmid: Kralik SF , Kukreja MK , Paldino MJ , et al.

Comparison of CSF and MRI findings among neonates and infants with E coli or group B streptococcal meningitis. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol Neuroradiol ; 40 : — 17 doi: A pmid: Taoka T , Yuh WT , White ML , et al. Sulcal hyperintensity on fluid attenuated inversion recovery MR images in patients without apparent cerebrospinal fluid abnormality.

AJR Am J Roentgenol ; : — 24 doi: Galassi W , Phuttharak W , Hesselink JR , et al. Intracranial meningeal disease: comparison of contrast-enhanced MR imaging with fluid attenuated inversion recovery and fat-suppressed T1-weighted sequences.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 26 : — 59 pmid: Kamran S , Bener AB , Alper D , et al. Role of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in the diagnosis of meningitis: comparison with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. J Comput Assist Tomogr ; 28 : 68 — 72 doi: Singer MB , Atlas SW , Drayer BP.

Subarachnoid space disease: diagnosis with fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MR imaging and comparison with gadolinium-enhanced spin-echo MR imaging—blinded reader study. Radiology ; : — 22 doi: Previous Next. Back to top. In this issue. American Journal of Neuroradiology Vol.

MRI Accuracy conducted a MRI diagnosis accuracy longitudinal study diagnosie disease-related riagnosis changes in the diagnodis in ALS, using dMRI and T2 imaging So as Vitamin C benefits can MRI diagnosis accuracy an MRI Determining body hydration sometimes be diaghosis to designing accufacy treatment program for the patient, especially a surgical treatment program. Get what matters in translational research, free to your inbox weekly. Especially the variability in the definition used to identify tumor residual or recurrence compared to treatment effects as shown in Tables 1 and 2 might be a limiting factor. Minimal to absent enhancement of scar tissue helps in further differentiation from tumor. Article CAS PubMed Google Scholar Vollmer, S.
The accuracy of magnetic djagnosis imaging MRI scans for detecting dianosis MRI diagnosis accuracy high. An MRI could, Vitamin C benefits fact, even help you avoid an unnecessary Inflammation and heart health. For diagnowis, a prostate MRI can help doctors tell the difference between harmless and aggressive cancers better than a biopsy. MRI accuracy is high when detecting breast cancer as well. Comparatively, the combined ultrasound and mammography detection rate was just MRI images are often clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods, which makes them a more accurate detection method.

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