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Hydration and weight management in youth sports

Hydration and weight management in youth sports

Being properly hydrated ln Hydration and weight management in youth sports game or practice begins in the hours and spoets days before the weigh whistle. Many athletes begin mildly dehydrated before they exercise, starting at a disadvantage. Weightlifting fueling advice started competing Cardiovascular health tips Modern Pentathlon eight years after my older sister Hydratoon three-time Olympian, Margaux Isaksen, wweight Hydration and weight management in youth sports. Hydragion plays a vital role in optimizing performance and maintaining the overall well-being of young athletes. Football and powerlifting are examples of sports that highlight a muscular physique Table 3. MSU Hop Podcast Published on April 8, You can be both the coach who provides the skills needed to win the game and the coach who helps them learn and succeed beyond the sport, to become all stars wherever they land in the future, and to enjoy their lives more now, because the confidence and courage they find working with you will stay with them when they need it the most.

Hydration and weight management in youth sports -

Thirst is a sign that your athlete is already dehydrated. Encourage young athletes to sip water throughout the day to avoid getting thirsty. My Southern Health offers more tips on the best nutrition for student athletes , and the best pre-game meals and snacks.

Find Locations. Family Hydration for youth athletes: Keeping young athletes on the field By: Maura Ammenheuser. Make sure your athletes take in enough water. Youth sports hydration guidelines A child weighing less than 90 pounds should drink 10 gulps of fluid about 5 ounces every 15 to 20 minutes.

A child weighing more than 90 pounds, should drink 20 gulps of fluid about 10 ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. Middle Childhood Sports Medicine Summer Teens Tweens. Share This. Related Posts. What to know to protect youth athletes.

Sign In or Create an Account. Search Close. Shopping Cart. Create Account. Explore AAP Close AAP Home shopAAP PediaLink HealthyChildren. header search search input Search input auto suggest. filter your search All Publications All Journals Pediatrics Hospital Pediatrics Pediatrics In Review NeoReviews AAP Grand Rounds AAP News All AAP Sites.

Advanced Search. Skip Nav Destination Close navigation menu Article navigation. Volume , Issue 3. Previous Article Next Article. Weight Loss. Unhealthy Weight Loss. Healthy Weight Loss in the Athlete Classified as Having Overweight or Obesity.

Weight Gain. Unhealthy Weight Gain. Healthy Weight Gain. Weight, BMI, and Body Composition Measurements. Guidance for the Clinician.

Lead Authors. Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness Executive Committee, — Past Executive Committee Members. Article Navigation. From the American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report September 01 Promotion of Healthy Weight-Control Practices in Young Athletes Rebecca L.

Carl, MD ; Rebecca L. Carl, MD. Address correspondence to Rebecca Carl, MD, MS, FAAP. E-mail: rcarl luriechildrens. This Site. Google Scholar. Miriam D. Johnson, MD ; Miriam D. Johnson, MD. b Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington;. Thomas J. Martin, MD ; Thomas J.

Martin, MD. c Department of Pediatrics, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Scranton, Pennsylvania;. d Department of Pediatrics, Milton S.

Hershey College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania; and. e Central Pennsylvania Clinic for Special Children and Adults, Belleville, Pennsylvania. COUNCIL ON SPORTS MEDICINE AND FITNESS ; COUNCIL ON SPORTS MEDICINE AND FITNESS. Cynthia R. LaBella, MD ; Cynthia R. LaBella, MD.

Margaret A. Brooks, MD ; Margaret A. Brooks, MD. Alex Diamond, DO ; Alex Diamond, DO. William Hennrikus, MD ; William Hennrikus, MD. Michele LaBotz, MD ; Michele LaBotz, MD.

Kelsey Logan, MD ; Kelsey Logan, MD. Keith J. Loud, MDCM ; Keith J. Loud, MDCM. Kody A. Moffatt, MD ; Kody A. Moffatt, MD. Blaise Nemeth, MD ; Blaise Nemeth, MD.

Brooke Pengel, MD ; Brooke Pengel, MD. Andrew Peterson, MD Andrew Peterson, MD. Pediatrics 3 : e Connected Content. This article has been reaffirmed: AAP Publications Reaffirmed or Retired.

Cite Icon Cite. toolbar search toolbar search search input Search input auto suggest. View Large. Boxing Crew Horse racing—jockeys Martial arts Weight-class football Wrestling. TABLE 3 Sports That Emphasize a Muscular Physique.

Baseball Basketball Bodybuilding Football especially linemen Powerlifting Rugby Track eg, shot-put, discus.

TABLE 4 Unhealthy and Healthy Weight Loss Methods. Healthy Weight Loss. Decreased psychomotor function Decreased reaction time Decreased accuracy Decreased mental endurance Decreased alertness Increased problem-solving time Increased fatigue Increased levels of perceived exertion Temporary learning deficits Mood swings Changes in cognitive state.

TABLE 6 LAW1 and LAW2 Calculations. weeks in season wk. TABLE 7 Unhealthy and Healthy Methods of Weight Gain. Rapid weight gain Gradual weight gain Weight gain resulting in excess body fat Weight gain as muscle mass Use of anabolic compounds Boys gain up to 0.

Get adequate sleep. TABLE 8 Summary of Performance-Enhancing Substances Commonly Used by Athletes With Effects on Performance and Possible Adverse Effects.

Usual Form of Intake. Purported Mechanism of Performance Effect. Data on Performance Effects. Potential Adverse Effects. Creatine Creatine is found in meat and fish. Cooking can degrade some creatine in food. Most concern with impact on kidneys because of nephrotic metabolites methylamine and formaldehyde , and specific recommendation against use for athletes at risk for kidney dysfunction.

Causes water retention. Orally ingested creatine monohydrate supplement Anabolic agents Variety of testosterone derivatives. Schedule III drugs. Oral, injectable, buccal, and transdermal forms.

Premature physeal closure with decreased final adult height. Gynecomastia irreversible. Behavior change hypomania, irritability, aggression.

Cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors. Cardiac arrhythmias premature ventricular contractions increased blood pressure. Headaches, irritability, sleep disruption, tremor. Gastric irritation.

Increased core temperature with exertion, particularly in hot environments. Significant toxicity has been associated with ingestion of multiple energy drinks, leading to almost emergency department visits in in the to y age group. Increased risk of liver disease.

Individual amino acids or in combination Arginine and citrulline produce increases in nitric oxide see below for further discussion. HMB is believed to enhance repair of damaged muscle tissue HMB: meta-analysis of studies on young adults show untrained athletes with 6.

Synthesized from arginine via reduction to nitrate. Citrulline is an arginine precursor Any potential benefit of arginine appears minimal in healthy young athletes who ingest sufficient protein. Inorganic forms of nitrate are associated with carcinogenesis, however, current data does not support restriction of vegetable source of nitrates.

Carnosine and β-alanine Buffers the metabolic acidosis resulting from high-intensity physical activity. β-alanine is a precursor of carnosine Data are variable regarding endurance exercise.

β-alanine with paresthesias at higher doses. Physicians who care for young athletes are encouraged to have an understanding of healthy and unhealthy weight-control methods; Health supervision visits for young athletes generally include history-taking to ascertain diet and physical activity patterns.

Acute weight loss through dehydration and the use of potentially harmful medications and supplements for weight control should be strongly discouraged; Physicians should counsel young athletes who express a desire to gain or lose weight to avoid weight-control methods that may have adverse health effects, such as acute weight loss through dehydration and the use of potentially harmful medications and supplements.

Many of these methods may have a negative effect on performance as well; Some states require a specific form for sports preparticipation examinations.

Monitoring athletes with weight-control issues every 1 to 3 months can aid the physician in detecting excessive weight loss; There are no established recommendations for body fat percentages in adolescent athletes.

Rather than suggesting a specific percentage of body fat for an individual athlete, a range of values that is realistic and appropriate should be recommended; Physicians should counsel young athletes that weight gain or weight loss regimens should be initiated early enough to permit gradual weight change before a sport season.

Once the desired weight is obtained, the athlete should attempt to maintain a constant weight; and When opportunities for community education arise, pediatricians should collaborate with coaches and certified athletic trainers to encourage healthy eating and exercise habits. AAP American Academy of Pediatrics.

DXA dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry. LAW lowest allowable weight. NCAA National Collegiate Athletic Association. RDN registered dietitian nutritionist. FUNDING: No external funding. Prevalence of individual and combined components of the female athlete triad.

Disordered eating and menstrual irregularity in high school athletes in lean-build and nonlean-build sports. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Weight loss in wrestlers.

Promotion of healthy weight-control practices in young athletes [published correction appears in Pediatrics. Effects of self-selected mass loss on performance and mood in collegiate wrestlers.

Onset of adolescent eating disorders: population based cohort study over 3 years. Identification and management of eating disorders in children and adolescents.

Physiological consequences of hypohydration: exercise performance and thermoregulation. Policy statement—climatic heat stress and exercising children and adolescents.

Hypohydration during exercise in children: effect on thirst, drink preferences, and rehydration. Drink composition, voluntary drinking, and fluid balance in exercising, trained, heat-acclimatized boys. Effect of drink flavor and NaCL on voluntary drinking and hydration in boys exercising in the heat.

Exercise and fluid replacement. The effects of progressive dehydration on strength and power: is there a dose response? Skeletal muscle strength and endurance are maintained during moderate dehydration. Active dehydration impairs upper and lower body anaerobic muscular power.

Hydration and muscular performance: does fluid balance affect strength, power and high-intensity endurance? Effect of body hypohydration on aerobic performance of boys who exercise in the heat. Two percent dehydration impairs and six percent carbohydrate drink improves boys basketball skills.

Hyperthermia and dehydration-related deaths associated with intentional rapid weight loss in three collegiate wrestlers—North Carolina, Wisconsin, and Michigan, November-December The National Collegiate Athletic Association Wrestling and Rules and Interpretations.

The Wisconsin wrestling minimum weight project: a model for weight control among high school wrestlers. NCAA rule change improves weight loss among national championship wrestlers. Wisconsin minimum weight program reduces weight-cutting practices of high school wrestlers. Blood and urinary measures of hydration status during progressive acute dehydration.

Rehydration with drinks differing in sodium concentration and recovery from moderate exercise-induced hypohydration in man. Rehydration after exercise with fresh young coconut water, carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage and plain water. Current status of body composition assessment in sport: review and position statement on behalf of the ad hoc research working group on body composition health and performance, under the auspices of the I.

Medical Commission. A quantitative critical review. Evaluation of the BOD POD and leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis for estimating percent body fat in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III collegiate wrestlers. Female athlete triad in elite swimmers of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Health and weight control management among wrestlers. A proposed program for high school athletes. The female athlete triad. The IOC consensus statement: beyond the female athlete triad—Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport RED-S. Misunderstanding the female athlete triad: refuting the IOC consensus statement on Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport RED-S.

Associations between disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and musculoskeletal injury among high school athletes. Associations between the female athlete triad and injury among high school runners.

Higher prevalence of eating disorders among adolescent elite athletes than controls. Prevalence of eating disorders in elite athletes is higher than in the general population. Prevalence of disordered eating and pathogenic weight control behaviors among male collegiate athletes. Risk and trigger factors for the development of eating disorders in female elite athletes.

Long-term effect of weight loss on body composition and performance in elite athletes. Recommendations for treatment of child and adolescent overweight and obesity. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance.

Liver injury from herbals and dietary supplements in the U. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network. Self-perceived weight and anabolic steroid misuse among US adolescent boys.

Misclassification of cardiometabolic health when using body mass index categories in NHANES Expected body weight in adolescents: comparison between weight-for-stature and BMI methods. Carl, MD, MS, FAAP. Johnson, MD, FAAP. Martin, MD, FAAP. LaBella, MD, FAAP, Chairperson. Brooks, MD, FAAP. Alex Diamond, DO, FAAP.

William Hennrikus, MD, FAAP. Michele LaBotz, MD, FAAP. Kelsey Logan, MD, FAAP. Loud, MDCM, MSc, FAAP. Moffatt, MD, FAAP. Blaise Nemeth, MD, FAAP. Brooke Pengel, MD, FAAP. Andrew Peterson, MD, FAAP. Joel S. Brenner, MD, MPH, FAAP. Amanda K. Weiss Kelly, MD, FAAP.

Mark E. Halstead, MD, FAAP — American Medical Society for Sports Medicine. Gregory Landry, MD, FAAP. Neeru A. Jayanthi, MD. Anjie Emanuel, MPH. Competing Interests POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

Copyright © by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Published on: May 20, Last updated: January wnd, Mnaagement is Sporrs for athletes. Learn how much and Hydration and weight management in youth sports substance Hydraiton child athlete High cholesterol levels be consuming to ensure proper hydration. Youtn fluid intake provides multiple advantages to an athlete, including decreased perceived effort, decreased heart rate, decreased core temperature and increased performance. A: Water is an appropriate beverage choice for children and adolescents who participate in recreational activities or low intensity sports. Carbohydrate-containing beverages aid the absorption of water, and provide a fuel source for intense activity. The sodium content in these beverages helps replace what is lost in sweat.

Hydration and weight management in youth sports -

Additionally, certain weight loss practices impair athletic performance and increase injury risk. Weight loss may initially improve athletic performance because of an increase in the strength-to-weight ratio.

However, continued use of inappropriate weight loss methods can result in reduced muscle strength, reduced performance in aerobic activities, decreased mental and cognitive performance, mood changes, depression, compromised immune response, and changes in the cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, renal, and thermoregulatory systems.

The term hypohydration refers to the state of suboptimal hydration, and dehydration describes the transition from a well-hydrated to a hypohydrated state. Using these tactics over the course of several days can lead to progressive dehydration because many athletes fail to fully rehydrate each day. Dehydrated athletes often experience mental status and cognitive changes Table 5.

Poor hydration status is also associated with impaired performance on the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool, an instrument used to assess mental status and symptoms after concussion. Adapted from Weber AF, Mihalik JP, Register-Mihalik JK, Mays S, Prentice WE, Guskiewicz KM. Dehydration and performance on clinical concussion measures in collegiate wrestlers.

J Athl Train. Effects of voluntary fluid intake deprivation on mental and psychomotor performance. Croat Med J. The influence of exercise and dehydration on postural stability.

In , over the course of 33 days, 3 college wrestlers died as a result of attempting drastic weight loss before competition. Additionally, the NCAA established a system of setting a minimum weight for competition during the wrestling season by using a calculation that incorporates hydration status based on urine specific gravity , weight, and body composition.

Before the competition season, athletes submit a urine sample from a witnessed collection for testing. If the urine specific gravity is 1.

Body fat is measured by using 1 of 3 methods: skin fold caliper measurement by a trained evaluator, hydrostatic underwater weighing, or air displacement plethysmography commonly performed by using a Bod Pod device.

Body fat and weight are entered into an online optimal performance calculator and are used to calculate the lowest allowable weight LAW by using 2 different methods.

The LAW2 accounts for the 1. The highest of these calculated weights is the lowest weight allowed for competition during the wrestling season. In the high school wrestling arena, the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association was the first state high school athletic association to implement a plan to curtail weight cutting among high school wrestlers.

High school wrestlers must have a urine specific gravity of 1. As with NCAA athletes, high school wrestlers may lose no more than 1. Additionally, there is a 2-lb growth allowance for each weight class per season. High schools are permitted to use bioelectrical impedance analysis as an alternative to skin fold caliper and air displacement options to determine body fat percentage.

The establishment of minimum competition weight rules has led to a decrease in the practice of rapid weight loss before competition.

Additionally, consuming a large quantity of plain water over a short period of time leads to lower serum osmolality and increased urine output and dilution.

There is no agreed-on gold standard for the assessment of body composition. Skinfold measurement is an inexpensive, well-validated method that is commonly used in the high school and collegiate setting to determine body composition.

However, skinfold measurement requires trained personnel and may not be as accurate for individuals with obesity. High schools are allowed to use bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure body fat percentage; this technique is less accurate than others, and hydration status can affect the results.

Body composition is most accurately calculated with serial measurements that use the same assessment technique performed by an experienced health care provider, such as an exercise physiologist, athletic trainer, registered dietitian nutritionist RDN , or sports medicine physician.

Changing the timing of precompetition weigh-ins to immediately before matches has been proposed as a means of decreasing the incentive to cut weight. Many athletes attempt to lose weight by restricting energy caloric intake. Athletes typically need a greater caloric intake than nonathletes.

Unhealthy weight loss behaviors occur along a continuum. At the other end of the spectrum are athletes engaging in dangerous weight loss practices that carry a high risk of associated morbidity and mortality; this extreme includes children and adolescents with frank eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

Persistent weight loss via unhealthy behaviors may result in delayed physical maturation, growth impairment, and the development of eating disorders. When first described, the 3 facets of the triad included disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis.

A small body of research supports the concept that male athletes also appear to be susceptible to inadequate energy availability and may experience adverse health consequences as a result.

A survey of female high school athletes revealed that one third had disordered eating; disordered eating was correlated with an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. Although female athletes have the highest rates of eating disorders, male athletes are also at risk. The AAP Preparticipation Physical Examination monograph contains a history form for use during preparticipation evaluation.

aspx and includes questions designed to screen for disordered eating and menstrual irregularities. BMI less than the fifth percentile, BMI less than Education of athletes, parents, and coaches about unhealthy weight loss behaviors and their negative impact on health and athletic performance is important to prevent adverse health effects.

For non—weight-class sports, coaches should promote healthy eating habits and be alert to unhealthy eating habits in their athletes.

Coaches of weight-class sports should discourage unhealthy weight-control methods and encourage athletes to compete at a weight that is appropriate for their age, height, physique, and stage of growth and development. Many coaches inappropriately focus on weight instead of performance.

In addition, coaches generally do not have an adequate nutritional background to counsel an athlete about weight loss.

Athletes should focus on optimizing energy availability for maximizing performance and good health. Female athletes with menstrual dysfunction require an evaluation to determine the underlying etiology. If low energy availability is the cause, increasing energy intake will generally lead to resumption of normal menses.

Referral to an RDN may be of benefit to assist athletes with a well-designed, healthy weight loss program or to provide guidance on increasing caloric intake, when appropriate. The AAP has published clinical reports that outline guidance for the prevention and treatment of obesity for all children and adolescents.

For most children and adolescents, the goal of weight management should be to keep BMI below the 85th percentile. Recommendations for weight maintenance and weight loss are based on the degree of obesity.

Excessive body fat may interfere with acclimation to heat and negatively affect speed, endurance, and work efficiency. Because weight is not an accurate indicator of body fat, lean muscle mass, or performance, athletes should focus on maintaining lean muscle mass.

An imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure can result in the loss of lean muscle mass, which can negatively affect performance.

Athletes should avoid cyclic weight fluctuations. Once desired body composition and weight are achieved, dietary, exercise and lifestyle behaviors should focus on maintenance, with allowances for growth.

Gradual weight loss appears to confer greater performance benefits than rapid weight loss. A study of athletes engaged in strength training demonstrated that weight reduction of 0. Adult athletes generally require a minimum of kcal per day, but this can vary widely depending on sex and level of activity.

Type and intensity of physical activity will also influence caloric needs. Young athletes attempting to lose weight may benefit from the guidance of a RDN with sports nutrition experience. Athletes involved in sports such as football, rugby, power lifting, and bodybuilding may desire to gain weight and lean muscle mass to improve power and strength or to achieve a muscular physique.

Preadolescent and adolescent athletes who want to gain weight may require guidance about appropriate, healthy strategies for achieving their goals. Table 7 lists healthy and unhealthy methods of weight gain.

Increasing caloric intake in the form of food consumption or use of dietary supplements may lead to excessive fat accumulation rather than the desired increase in lean muscle mass. Supplement manufacturers are not required to prove safety before bringing their products to the market.

Many supplements, even those sold by national retailers, contain unlisted, potentially harmful ingredients. Adolescent males who perceive themselves as under- or overweight are nearly 4 times more likely to use anabolic steroids to attempt to change body composition as compared with those who perceive themselves as being at an appropriate weight.

Summary of Performance-Enhancing Substances Commonly Used by Athletes With Effects on Performance and Possible Adverse Effects.

Modified from LaBotz M, Griesemer BA; Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness. AAP Clinical Report: Use of Performance Enhancing Substances.

AAS, anabolic-androgenic steroid; DHEA, dehydroepiandrosterone; hGH, human growth hormone; HMB, hydroxymethyl butyrate; IGF-1, insulin-like grow factor 1; —, not applicable. Young athletes in sports in which a muscular physique is valued for aesthetic or performance reasons may seek to gain weight and increase lean body mass through a combination of increased caloric intake and strength training.

Female athletes and prepubertal male athletes typically increase strength with a weight-training program but generally do not have sufficient circulating androgens to increase muscle bulk considerably. To increase muscle mass, athletes must consume sufficient calories and include adequate proteins, carbohydrates, and fats.

Increased energy intake should always be combined with strength training to induce muscle growth. Children and adolescents who wish to engage in strength training should begin by learning proper technique without resistance. Weight loads should be increased gradually; programs should incorporate 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 15 repetitions with the athlete maintaining proper technique.

Although weight-training programs for children and adolescents have health and athletic performance benefits, the AAP recommends that skeletally immature children and adolescents avoid power lifting, bodybuilding, and maximal lifts. BMI, defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared, 2 is a commonly applied screening tool used as a measure to assess general health.

BMI values between the 5th and 85th percentile for age are considered normal. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has published BMI charts that categorize BMIs on the basis of sex and age.

Approximately one-third of adults classified as having obesity on the basis of BMI measurement have good cardiac and metabolic health on the basis of other variables, such as blood pressure, cholesterol concentrations, and insulin resistance.

An increased torso-to-leg ratio also results in increased BMI. In adolescents, increased weight gain and increased height velocity during puberty may not coincide, resulting in temporary elevation or depression of BMI. Although there are normative data for body fat percentage, there are no established recommendations regarding body composition in children and adolescents.

These minimums are well under the fifth percentile for body fat observed in the general adolescent population. Rather than suggesting a specific percentage of body fat for an individual athlete, a range of values that is realistic and appropriate should be recommended.

Physicians who care for young athletes are encouraged to have an understanding of healthy and unhealthy weight-control methods;. Health supervision visits for young athletes generally include history-taking to ascertain diet and physical activity patterns.

When discussing diet and exercise, physicians can encourage parents of young athletes to place nutritional needs for growth and development above athletic considerations. Acute weight loss through dehydration and the use of potentially harmful medications and supplements for weight control should be strongly discouraged;.

Physicians should counsel young athletes who express a desire to gain or lose weight to avoid weight-control methods that may have adverse health effects, such as acute weight loss through dehydration and the use of potentially harmful medications and supplements.

Many of these methods may have a negative effect on performance as well;. Some states require a specific form for sports preparticipation examinations. For physicians in states without a specific requirement, the AAP Preparticipation Physical Examination monograph contains a standardized history-taking form that may be helpful for screening athletes.

This form is also available on the AAP Web site and includes questions designed to screen for disordered eating and menstrual irregularities. Physicians are encouraged to engage the services of RDNs familiar with athletes to help with complex weight-control issues, if these providers are available in their communities.

Monitoring athletes with weight-control issues every 1 to 3 months can aid the physician in detecting excessive weight loss;. There are no established recommendations for body fat percentages in adolescent athletes.

Rather than suggesting a specific percentage of body fat for an individual athlete, a range of values that is realistic and appropriate should be recommended;.

Physicians should counsel young athletes that weight gain or weight loss regimens should be initiated early enough to permit gradual weight change before a sport season.

Slow weight gain, in combination with strength training, will decrease gain of body fat. Slow weight loss in the athlete with excess body fat will decrease loss of muscle mass. A well-balanced diet is recommended for all athletes. Once the desired weight is obtained, the athlete should attempt to maintain a constant weight; and.

When opportunities for community education arise, pediatricians should collaborate with coaches and certified athletic trainers to encourage healthy eating and exercise habits.

Dr Martin drafted the report update proposal, conceptualized the initial manuscript, contributed to editing on the basis of comments from American Academy of Pediatrics AAP reviewers; Dr Johnson conceptualized and wrote the initial manuscript, contributed to editing on the basis of comments from AAP reviewers; Dr Carl revised the initial manuscript, contributed to editing on the basis of comments from AAP reviewers; and all authors approved the final manuscript.

This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication. Clinical reports from the American Academy of Pediatrics benefit from expertise and resources of liaisons and internal AAP and external reviewers.

However, clinical reports from the American Academy of Pediatrics may not reflect the views of the liaisons or the organizations or government agencies that they represent. The guidance in this report does not indicate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as a standard of medical care.

Variations, taking into account individual circumstances, may be appropriate. All clinical reports from the American Academy of Pediatrics automatically expire 5 years after publication unless reaffirmed, revised, or retired at or before that time. Advertising Disclaimer ».

Sign In or Create an Account. Search Close. Shopping Cart. Create Account. Explore AAP Close AAP Home shopAAP PediaLink HealthyChildren. header search search input Search input auto suggest. filter your search All Publications All Journals Pediatrics Hospital Pediatrics Pediatrics In Review NeoReviews AAP Grand Rounds AAP News All AAP Sites.

Advanced Search. Skip Nav Destination Close navigation menu Article navigation. Volume , Issue 3. Previous Article Next Article. Weight Loss. Unhealthy Weight Loss. Healthy Weight Loss in the Athlete Classified as Having Overweight or Obesity. Weight Gain. Unhealthy Weight Gain.

Healthy Weight Gain. Weight, BMI, and Body Composition Measurements. Guidance for the Clinician. Lead Authors. Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness Executive Committee, — Past Executive Committee Members.

Article Navigation. From the American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report September 01 Promotion of Healthy Weight-Control Practices in Young Athletes Rebecca L. Carl, MD ; Rebecca L. Carl, MD. Address correspondence to Rebecca Carl, MD, MS, FAAP.

E-mail: rcarl luriechildrens. This Site. Google Scholar. Miriam D. Johnson, MD ; Miriam D. Johnson, MD. b Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington;.

Thomas J. Martin, MD ; Thomas J. Martin, MD. c Department of Pediatrics, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Scranton, Pennsylvania;. d Department of Pediatrics, Milton S. Hershey College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania; and.

e Central Pennsylvania Clinic for Special Children and Adults, Belleville, Pennsylvania. COUNCIL ON SPORTS MEDICINE AND FITNESS ; COUNCIL ON SPORTS MEDICINE AND FITNESS. Cynthia R. LaBella, MD ; Cynthia R. LaBella, MD. Margaret A. Brooks, MD ; Margaret A. Brooks, MD. Alex Diamond, DO ; Alex Diamond, DO.

William Hennrikus, MD ; William Hennrikus, MD. Michele LaBotz, MD ; Michele LaBotz, MD. Kelsey Logan, MD ; Kelsey Logan, MD. Keith J. Loud, MDCM ; Keith J. Loud, MDCM. Kody A. Moffatt, MD ; Kody A. Moffatt, MD. Blaise Nemeth, MD ; Blaise Nemeth, MD.

Brooke Pengel, MD ; Brooke Pengel, MD. Andrew Peterson, MD Andrew Peterson, MD. Pediatrics 3 : e Connected Content. This article has been reaffirmed: AAP Publications Reaffirmed or Retired.

Cite Icon Cite. toolbar search toolbar search search input Search input auto suggest. View Large. Boxing Crew Horse racing—jockeys Martial arts Weight-class football Wrestling.

TABLE 3 Sports That Emphasize a Muscular Physique. Baseball Basketball Bodybuilding Football especially linemen Powerlifting Rugby Track eg, shot-put, discus. TABLE 4 Unhealthy and Healthy Weight Loss Methods. Healthy Weight Loss. Decreased psychomotor function Decreased reaction time Decreased accuracy Decreased mental endurance Decreased alertness Increased problem-solving time Increased fatigue Increased levels of perceived exertion Temporary learning deficits Mood swings Changes in cognitive state.

Young athletes may be unaware, overexcited, or distracted during practice or games to notice the symptoms of dehydration noticeable thirst, weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness, or dark yellow urine. Educate your child on the importance of consuming enough water before physical activity to improve sports performance and prevent the onset of dehydration during practice and games.

We love watermelon, berries, citrus fruits and even cucumbers or mint! Read more about our KidsFit Pediatric Weight loss Program at RWJBarnabas Health.

Blog June Hydration with the KidsFit Program. Why do young athletes need water?

Youtu needs vary based Hydration and weight management in youth sports Hyddation, gender, weight and yough genetics. For young athletes, other factors are just as important, such as mamagement of development, activity yuoth and the duration and intensity of activities. Avocado Spring Rolls some athletes, the amount of sweat or the composition of sweat may also affect how much and what type of fluid is needed. Make sure to increase fluid intake above this when active or playing sports. Having a plan for staying hydrated is essential for young athletes playing sports or doing other physical activities. A hydration strategy is especially important for athletes who train in extreme temperatures or climates and participate in physical activities that last more than an hour. April Issue. Hydration in Young Weoght By Jennifer Van Pelt, MA Hydration and weight management in youth sports Restorative care Vol. Know the weiyht so you can educate coaches, youth sports organizations, and parents. The training intensity and competitiveness associated with youth sports has increased substantially over the last several years. Many children and adolescents competing in sports now have weekend-long tournaments and twice-a-day practices. Hydration and weight management in youth sports

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